Parrot Toy Angels: September 2013 Angel Wings
Parrot Toy Angels

Angel Wings

A monthly journal for human angels who make a positive difference in companion birds' lives.


September 2013
Volume 8, Issue IX

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In this month's issue:

    Angel Announcements
    Tabbouleh for the Birds
    An Angel Amongst Us
    Bird Fancier's Lung
    Rikki Sez
    Out With the Trash
    Preparing Your Parrot for a Disaster
    Parrot First Aid Kit
    Angels Wanted
    Help Us


Welcome

Suzie B. from Ohio

Angel Toys For Angels

September's Featured Footers



Stainless Steel Tongue Pleazers
SS Tongue Pleazers
Large to XL Birds


Beaded Wonder
Beaded Wonder
Medium Birds


Gonzo's Tongue Teazer
Gonzo's Tongue Teazer
Medium to Large Birds


Check out all the
Angel Toys for Angels

now!

Back to School
ANGEL ANNOUNCEMENTS
Watch for upcoming events, news, website updates, etc. here


   

ON THE SITE:

♥ New Items ♥
♥ Toy Making Kits ♥
♥ Happy Flappers ♥


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WOW!  Lookie.... a PTA Coupon


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Tabbouleh for the Birds
By Toni Fortin


1 cup bulgur wheat (quick cooking)
1 cup boiling water
1 cup frozen collards, chopped
1 cup garbanzo beans, soaked, boil until tender while skimming
1/2 cup chopped celery
1 yellow and 1 red sweet mini pepper, chopped with the seeds
Small amount of chopped cucumber
Sprinkle of chia seeds


In a medium plastic or stainless steel bowl put in the bulgur wheat and boiling water. Cover. Let stand for one hour. Stir in all ingredients except cucumber and chia seeds. Sprinkle cucumber and chia seeds on top. This freezes well.


NOTE: If freezing, add cucumber and chia seeds after Tabbouleh has thawed.


Tabbouleh for the Birds!


My girls gave it a beaks up!


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An Angel Amongst Us


Parrot Toy Angels come in all shapes and sizes, and from all walks of life. Let us take this opportunity to get to know each other better and introduce you to one of our Angels.


This months Angel Amongst Us is Leigh Anne...


Leigh Anne


Leigh Anne lives in the sunny state of Florida, and is owned by two parrots - Casey, a 33-year-old Blue & Gold Macaw who she adopted from a rescue when he was 18, and Ricky, a special needs Red Lored Amazon who was found in a city park. Ricky's legs and feet didn't develop properly, and she is probably about 2 years old. Leigh Anne loves teaching her birds new tricks and words. Casey just learned to put his foot in front of his beak when he says "Shhhhh". Ricky's newest word is "What", and she can mimic a chicken perfectly.


She also has 2 Boston Terriers - Jill, 10 years old, and Molly, 8 years old - and a 14-year-old Maltese named Coco. All 3 came from rescues.


Leigh Anne became an Angel through a friend who was in the group. Her friend had told her all about PTA and what they did for parrot rescues and individuals who needed toys for their birds. She knew how hard it was to get money together for bird toys and necessities, so she joined. Leigh Anne has learned to make toys for her own birds as well and is happy to give her time and talents to the Angels.


Leigh Ann is a self-employed freelance writer, e-book business owner, and enjoys anything having to do with crafting. Lately, she's enjoyed scrap booking, and is making memory scrapbooks for her siblings.


Leigh Anne says she's proud to be in PTA. She feels great that the group is making toys for those who need them.


Happily married to her 'soul-mate' Jim, who has recently retired, she is occupying his time with a huge 'honey-do' list as long as her arm!


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Bird Fancier's Lung
By Kim Perez


There are very few illnesses that we can pass to or contract from our birds. Technically, Bird Fancier's Lung is not something we "catch" from our birds, but it is rather something we develop from constant exposure to the avian proteins found in bird feathers and droppings.


The actual disease is called Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis. There are more than 30 different types of this pneumonitis, each with different causes, but similar symptoms. The symptoms include shortness of breath, fever and chills. These symptoms present themselves within 4 to 6 hours of exposure to birds. The symptoms themselves are common to many diseases, and are often mistaken as asthma. There are many asthmatics who keep birds, though, and the difference is that with Bird Fancier's Lung, mere exposure to the birds will cause the symptoms. In chronic cases, there is also extreme weight loss and fatigue.


Bird Fancier's Lung has some treatment options, but is only truly successful when you avoid all contact with birds. One can also be treated with inhalers and other medications (steroids) used for asthma. These are only temporary solutions until one can avoid birds all together.


If you suspect that you may have BFL, you should consult with your physician. Explain your concern and that you are constantly exposed to birds. There is no specific BFL test, but they can test you for allergies to birds through a skin test. If you test positive to the bird allergies and symptoms improve when not around your birds, you may be diagnosed with this disease. There is no cure at this time.


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Bird Cages Galore


Why buy a Bird Cage from Bird Cages Galore?? Because we do not "just sell" top quality cages at reasonable prices, provide free shipping and a free toy with each cage; we offer first rate customer service and will answer your questions about most bird-related matters. Visit us on the web, browse our selection, join our discussion forum and sign up for our free Newsletter,
The Caged Bird Courier.

We are here to help, because we care about your bird!!


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Rikki Sez


Rikki will try and answer frequently asked questions here.



Rikki, Mom puts me on this thing called a scale. Why?
Signed, Beaky in OH

Dear Beaky, Those scales tell your mom how much you weigh. She cares about that because it helps her make sure you stay healthy. Sometimes, if you are sick, you could lose weight and it might be the only way mom knows you are sick. It also helps her to make sure you are growing big and strong like you should, and that you aren't getting fat. You don't want to do that; it makes it hard to fly! So when mom puts you on the scale, just remember she loves you and cares, and don't wiggle so much!


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Rikki, I just got moved to a rescue. My old parronts said they didn't want me because I don't talk. I talk plenty. I talk loud. Are they deaf or do they just not understand me?
Signed, Sad and discarded

Dear Sad, They just don't understand. I'll never understand why humans think we should learn their way of talking when they don't learn ours! They should have done their research before they brought you home. Then they would have known that not all parrots can, or want to talk like they do. That doesn't make you any less special. I hope you find a loving home that can appreciate a parrot as a parrot, not as some image they have concocted in their silly little brains.


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Rikki, I have a band on my foot. Mom says I am from Florida and ended up in Ohio. She's not sure the band should be removed or not, for ID purposes, in case I get lost. Also she said something about microchip. That doesn't sound like fun. What do you think?
Signed, One Banded Birdie

Dear Banded, Lots of birds have bands; it's kinda like Birdie Bling. I generally recommend leaving a band alone unless it's causing problems, like irritation, constriction, or getting caught on something. If that's happening, then by all means, have it removed, but let a professional do it, okay? Microchips are about the size of a grain of rice. Research and most vet's recommend against chipping anything cockatiel size or smaller. It's usually done under anesthetic, too, so a bird of fragile health probably shouldn't get one. Microchips have helped reunite many birds, and other animals with their loved ones, if lost. It's a personal decision your parront should discuss with your regular vet. ---


Do you have a question for Rikki?
Please send it to The Editor at editor@parrottoyangels.org


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Out With the Trash!
By 'Sana Emberg


My hubby and I were out running his paper route, one cold night about 3am last winter when I spotted a small birdcage sitting out on the curb next to a trash bin. Now, I'm a thrifty person, and I just can't stand to see perfectly usable items thrown away, so I made the hubby stop so I could take a look. There was one perch in it, newspaper on the bottom, one scummy looking water dish, and a dish of picked through birdseed. I shook my head at the thought of any poor bird living in this, and hoped the cage was being thrown out because of an upgrade, not a death.


When I picked up the cage, something squeaked, and I almost dropped it. Then I noticed, in the corner, under the paper, something moving. My first thought was mice, but when I moved the paper, to my shock, there were two little budgies, huddled together! I don't know how long they'd been out there, but I'm surprised they were still alive; as it was maybe 36 degrees out there!


I hurriedly moved the cage into the car, and my husband was about to give me heck when he heard the birds chirping. I thought he was going to blow his top over the idea that someone could just throw birds out with the trash. He called the local cops while I was trying to get them warm in the back of the car. In record time, an officer showed up, and I think he was thankful when I said I'd take care of the birds. I'm sure he had no idea what to do with them. I left him with our address and phone number, and told him we wanted to be notified when they figured out why someone threw away live birds in freezing weather.


Mind you, we were supposed to be working, and I didn't want to just take the birds home, where I couldn't watch them. We swung by the house for fresh water, a bowl of diced veggies and some sprigs of millet, not to mention an extra blanket and clean bowls.


So, they rode the rest of our route in the back seat, nice and warm, a blanket covering 3 sides of the cage and the front open so I could see them. Within just a few minutes, they were up on the perch and checking out the food and water, and squawking away. I breathed a sigh of relief knowing that they just might be okay after all.


We went right from work to my vet, and he looked them all over. Aside from a bit of dehydration and being skinny, they got a clean bill of health, but he was amazed they were alive as well. We took them home, moved them into a bigger cage with tons of toys and lots of fresh food and water, and kept them in our bedroom.


We found out later that the birds belonged to a teenage girl. Her dad had set them outside as a lesson to her. He thought she'd be home shortly, and would bring them in, not realizing she was staying at a friends for the weekend. Didn't make a lot of sense to me, but folks do stupid things sometimes. It's just too bad the birds had to suffer for it.


We named the birds Sunshine and Cloudy, for their coloring, and they are happy members of our household. The 'tiels love them, looking on them like little brothers.


Boo, my Umbrella Too, isn't quite sure what to make of them, especially if they come flying through the living room when she's playing. She no longer hides under the covers, and instead yells 'Helllloooo' at them. And we're all happy we found the birds that got thrown out with the trash on a cold, cold night!


Sunshine & Cloudy


We'd love to run your "Favorite Bird Story". Send it to us at editor@parrottoyangels.org


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Preparing Your Parrot For A Disaster
By Leigh Anne Stewart


Well before a disaster happens, these tips will help you prepare yourself and your birds.


The first thing on your list should be to place your pets' travel cages in one place all the time, along with your other evacuation supplies. Have a cover for each cage, or grab some towels to use for covers. You will need a week's worth of bird food, nuts, hand-feeding formula with syringes, and canned fruits and vegetables that you know your birds love. Purchase at least 2 cases (or more) of filtered water to include. Have a couple of sets of bowls for each parrot.


You will also need at least one flashlight and extra batteries. Also, pack a radio that is battery powered. Place your parrot first aid kit in your supplies box. All of the supplies in the first aid kit can be used on human injuries.


Check your local area for pet friendly hotels. You may want to make a list of phone numbers of pet friendly national chains. Check with friends and family outside of your area as possible places to stay during a disaster. Make an evacuation plan and stick to it. Let family and friends know where you are going.


Be sure you have the following:
♥ First aid kit
♥ Several bath towels
♥ Newspaper
♥ A blanket or a few bed sheets
♥ Several bird toys
♥ Pet transport cages
♥ Spray bottle for misting your bird
♥ Heating pad
♥ Medications for you, your family members and the pets
♥ Pictures of your birds along with their medical records
♥ Garbage bags, gallon sized Ziploc baggies
♥ Cell phone and charger


If you must evacuate, place birds in the transport cages, and pack your car with your supplies. Make sure you have plenty of cash on hand and a full tank of gas. Check your supplies as you are putting them in the car, just to make sure you have everything you need.


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Parrot First Aid Kit
By Leigh Anne Stewart


Your kit should be large enough to accommodate all the items listed. Choose a sturdy, waterproof plastic container with a lid, in case you are evacuating in bad weather. The kit can also be placed in a large plastic bag to waterproof it.


Below is a list of items you may need during an emergency with a parrot:
♥ Cornstarch or baking soda
♥ Styptic powder
♥ Gauze bandages & gauze rolls
♥ Vet wrap
♥ Medical tape
♥ Q-tips & cotton balls
♥ Antiseptic wipes
♥ Hydrogen Peroxide & iodine
♥ Disposable eyedroppers
♥ Popsicle sticks to be used as splints
♥ Tweezers
♥ Small & large hemostats
♥ Magnifying glass
♥ Small & large flashlights with extra batteries
♥ Heating pad
♥ Towels
♥ Hand-feeding formula with syringes
♥ Your pet's medical records
♥ Veterinarian phone number
♥ Poison Control number


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Angels Wanted!!


Have these stories got your toymaking talons twitching? Do you want to help make a difference in somebirdie's life? Come join our ranks! We have Angels from all different backgrounds and walks of life, and there's always room for another generous heart.


Click here for: Angel Application


Click to join Parrot Toy Angels Yahoo! Group: Click to join ParrotToyAngels


Not a toy maker? Come join our Facebook Group:

Help Us Help the Birds...



Our Angels generously donate their time making toys for our needy feathered friends. Quality toy-making supplies are expensive and shipping charges are outrageous. That's why we need your support to help keep us going. Every dollar amount, large or small, is gratefully accepted. Donations are tax deductible.

We also welcome donations of toymaking parts and supplies. A receipt will be issued for every donation. Contact us at Parrot Toy Info for further information on donating.

All donations tax deductible.

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This is the official newsletter of the Parrot Toy Angels. Members and subscribers are encouraged to submit articles/photographs for publication. PTA reserves the right to reject, edit, or use only portions of items submitted. Opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the PTA Editor, Directors, Officers, or the general membership.

While PTA at all times tries to ensure any information provided in this newsletter is accurate, all articles are submitted by volunteers, and we are not avian professionals and make no claim as to the suitability of featured products, food, or toys for your particular bird. PTA strongly recommends that you ensure that all toys are safe, that you make sure your bird is fed a well balanced diet, and that you always provide continuing medical care through your avian vet.

Do you have a question or comment? Perhaps you have an idea for our newsletter, or simply want to share a story on how an Angel has touched your life. Drop us a line at: editor@parrottoyangels.org

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©  2008-2013 Parrot Toy Angels • P.O. Box 34372 • Houston, Texas  77234
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